Ain’t got no diploma! Navy lowers education requirements for enlistment no longer requiring high school graduation as military struggles with recruiting amid woke policy push

The US Navy lowered its education requirements and began recruiting individuals who had not graduated from high school.

Those joining the ranks are not required to have a high school diploma or General Education Development Diploma — the second time in about a year that the service has opened the door to lower-performing recruits as it struggles to meet hiring goals. reach.

The decision follows a move in December 2022 to bring in a larger number of recruits who scored very low on the Armed Services Qualification Test.

Both are fairly rare steps that the other military services largely avoid or limit, even as they all find it increasingly difficult to attract the dwindling number of young people who can meet the military’s physical, mental and moral standards.

Those joining the ranks are not required to have a high school diploma or General Education Development Diploma — the second time in about a year that the service has opened the door to lower-performing recruits as it struggles to meet hiring goals reach

Those joining the ranks are not required to have a high school diploma or General Education Development Diploma — the second time in about a year that the service has opened the door to lower-performing recruits as it struggles to meet hiring goals reach

'Every year we get thousands of people into our recruiting stations who want to join the navy but don't have an education certificate.  And we just turn them away,' says vice-adm.  Rick Cheeseman, the Navy's chief of staff

‘Every year we get thousands of people into our recruiting stations who want to join the navy but don’t have an education certificate. And we just turn them away,’ says vice-adm. Rick Cheeseman, the Navy’s chief of staff

Under the new plan, Navy recruits will be able to join without an education certificate as long as they score 50 or higher on the qualification test, which is out of 99.

The last time the service took individuals without education credentials was in 2000.

‘Every year we get thousands of people into our recruiting stations who want to join the navy but don’t have an education certificate. And we just turn them away,” Vice Adm. Rick Cheeseman, the Navy’s chief of staff, said Friday.

‘Every year we get thousands of people into our recruiting stations who want to join the navy but don’t have an education certificate. And we just turn them away.’

Last year, the Navy’s enlistment goal was 37,700, but the service brought in just 31,834. This year, Cheeseman said, he set the goal higher — at 40,600.

The total size of the fleet for 2024 is set at 337,800.

The United States also entered 2024 with its smallest military in more than eight decades and faces one of its “biggest challenges” as it tries to boost Gen Z recruitment, Pentagon officials said.

Under the $886 billion annual defense bill passed by Congress this week, the total number of active duty troops will drop to 1,284,500 this year.

It is the lowest total since before the US entered World War II in 1941 and officials said there should be a “national call to duty”.

Cheeseman added: ‘I need these sailors. So it’s a stretch goal. We tell our recruiters to go get 40,600 people to join the navy. We don’t quite expect to get that much. But we’re going for it.’

The other services largely balked at such changes.

The Navy is the only service that enlists anyone who is considered a ‘category four’ recruit, meaning they scored 30 or less on the qualification test.

Under the new plan, Navy recruits will be able to join without an education certificate as long as they score 50 or higher on the qualification test, which is out of 99

Under the new plan, Navy recruits will be able to join without an education certificate as long as they score 50 or higher on the qualification test, which is out of 99

The United States also entered 2024 with its smallest military in more than eight decades and faces one of its

The United States also entered 2024 with its smallest military in more than eight decades and faces one of its “biggest challenges” as it tries to boost Gen Z recruitment, Pentagon officials said.

The service expanded the number of those category four recruits, arguing that a number of positions — such as cook or boatswain — do not require an overall high test score as long as they meet the job standards.

The military will only take the lowest-scoring candidates into their so-called Future Soldier Prep Course, giving them weeks of instruction and the opportunity to raise their score to graduate and enlist.

The Navy allows recruits with a low score to go through its Future Sailor Prep Course, but does not require an elevated score to enroll.

In addition, the Army and Marine Corps require a high school diploma or GED equivalent, and the Air Force has said it will only take recruits without a diploma if they score a 65 or higher on the qualification test.

These numbers are very small — only 110 of the nearly 26,900 Air Force recruits brought in last year had either a GED or no education at all.

The Navy allows recruits with a low score to go through its Future Sailor Prep Course, but does not require an elevated score to enroll

The Navy allows recruits with a low score to go through its Future Sailor Prep Course, but does not require an elevated score to enroll

Other services cite concerns that lower-performing recruits are more likely to drop out or cause more disciplinary problems over time.

Cheeseman said he believes the biggest risk is that they do fail at higher rates, but he said the difference so far hasn’t been significant for the low-scoring recruits.

Overall, 11.4 percent of those recruits did not complete boot camp, compared to less than 6.5% of the high-scoring sailors.

He said Navy leaders have talked for some time about opening enrollment to those without high school credentials in an effort to expand the pool of potential sailors.

“We just finally decided, okay, let’s go. My argument for accepting that risk is that we have the capacity to camp. We do not fill the seats. So I’m willing to take a risk.’

This comes in the wake of the Navy’s decision to hire a drag artist to be its digital ambassador.

Yeoman 2nd Class Joshua Kelley, whose stage name is Harpy Daniels, announced on TikTok that he would be the Navy's first 'digital ambassador'

Yeoman 2nd Class Joshua Kelley, whose stage name is Harpy Daniels, announced on TikTok that he would be the Navy’s first ‘digital ambassador’

Yeoman 2nd Class Joshua Kelley, whose stage name is Harpy Daniels, announced on TikTok in November 2022 that he would be the Navy’s first ‘digital ambassador’, highlighting his journey from the start of 2018 onboard and growing into a ‘ advocate’ for those who were ‘oppressed in the service for years’.

Kelley, who identifies as non-binary, was one of just five active-duty sailors to serve as “digital ambassadors” for the Navy in its “efforts to reach a broad range of potential candidates.”

None of the digital ambassadors were paid, the spokesperson said, and no promotional or recruitment materials exist with the ambassadors.

Kelley said he began dressing in drag and performing in shows years before he joined the Navy, taking inspiration from the queens on RuPaul’s Drag Race — which he started watching at age 16.

The officer maintains he never experienced harassment in the Navy, but when he was scheduled to speak at a diversity, equity and inclusion event at Langley Joint Air Force Base in the summer of 2022, it caused an uproar for many conservatives and Christians cause extremists. ‘