Better signal up there? Man scales Eros statue in the middle of London’s Piccadilly Circus and starts scrolling through his phone

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This is the moment a man scaled a statue in Piccadilly Circus and started scrolling through his phone.

Onlookers were surprised to see a bald, bearded man in blue jeans and a gray jacket climbing up the Eros statue in London.

He appeared unfazed by a large police cordon and the buzz below, preferring instead to scroll on his phone.

Footage from later that night showed firefighters on a cherry picker talking to the man.

Piccadilly Circus tube station was closed for more than an hour while the incident was responded to.

Did YOU see what happened? Email chris.matthews@mailonline.co.uk

This is the moment a man scaled a statue in Piccadilly Circus and started scrolling through his phone

This is the moment a man scaled a statue in Piccadilly Circus and started scrolling through his phone

Onlookers were surprised to see a bald bearded man in blue jeans and a gray jacket climb the Eros statue in London

Onlookers were surprised to see a bald bearded man in blue jeans and a gray jacket climb the Eros statue in London

The Metropolitan Police told MailOnline: ‘Police are in Piccadilly Circus after a man climbed the Eros statue at around 6pm.

‘Officers are concerned for his welfare. Cordons are in place as they speak to the man.

“The London Ambulance Service and London Fire Brigade are also at the scene.”

A London Fire Brigade spokesman said: ‘Firefighters were called at 1812 to reports of a man climbing a fountain in Piccadilly Circus.

He appeared unfazed by a large police cordon and the buzz below, preferring instead to scroll on his phone

He appeared unfazed by a large police cordon and the buzz below, preferring instead to scroll on his phone

He appeared unfazed by a large police cordon and the buzz below, preferring instead to scroll on his phone

Footage from later that night showed firefighters on a cherry picker talking to the man

Footage from later that night showed firefighters on a cherry picker talking to the man

Piccadilly Circus tube station was closed for more than an hour while the incident was responded to

Piccadilly Circus tube station was closed for more than an hour while the incident was responded to

Two fire engines were dispatched to the scene and one of the Brigade’s 32 meter turntable ladders also attended.

Crews liaised with Metropolitan Police officers before leaving the incident in the care of the Met shortly after 2000.’

The Eros statue has been climbed a number of times since it was installed in 1893.

The famous London statue that rises above the tourists and traffic in Piccadilly Circus has been the victim of mistaken identity for almost its entire existence.

Commonly referred to as Eros, the Greek god of love, the statue is in fact (and always has been) a depiction of Anteros – Eros’ brother.

Other names for the statue include the Shaftesbury Monument and the Angel Of Christian Charity.

MailOnline has contacted TfL for comment.

What is the Eros statue in Piccadilly Circus?

The famous London statue that rises above the tourists and traffic in Piccadilly Circus has been the victim of mistaken identity for almost its entire existence.

Commonly referred to as Eros, the Greek god of love, the statue is in fact (and always has been) a depiction of Anteros – Eros’ brother.

Other names for the statue include the Shaftesbury Monument and the Angel Of Christian Charity.

Sculptor Alfred Gilbert even named his creation Anteros, but that didn’t stop countless tourists – as well as Londoners – from naming him after his brother (or, worse, the Roman god Cupid).

The statue and fountain was originally erected as the centerpiece of Piccadilly Circus, but was moved to its current location after the Second World War.

In Greek mythology, Anteros was the son of Ares and Aphrodite and was given to the lonely Eros as a playmate.

Where Eros was the god of frivolous and mischievous desire, and often unrequited love, Anteros was the more serious god of direct, returned love.

Unlike the arrow of Eros or Cupid, which struck its targets with desire, Anteros’ leaden arrow was literally a weapon to punish those who scorned love and avenge those who spurned their advances.

Gilbert had already completed his Anteros statue – modeled on the 16-year-old Italian studio assistant Angelo Colarossi – when he was commissioned to work on the Shaftesbury Memorial.

He said a statue depicting a god of selfless love was a fitting addition to a monument to the philanthropic Earl of Shaftesbury, known for his work with the poor.