Coles supermarket in Rose Bay Sydney under fire after recycling bin is found full of produce in ‘excellent condition’

A horrified shopper has blasted Coles after finding a recycling bin at the back of one of the supermarket giant’s stores full of discarded fruit and vegetables in ‘excellent condition’.

The man made the shocking discovery at the back of the Coles store in the upscale suburb of Rose Bay in Sydney’s eastern suburbs while walking through the area recently.

The shopper noticed that a large green food recycling container had been knocked over, dumping dozens of discarded fruits and vegetables over the curb and onto the road.

To his horror, he discovered that much of it was fresh, edible produce.

Tomatoes, potatoes and onions, which sell for an average of $4.50/kg at Coles stores, were among the produce thrown out.

Oranges and nectarines were among an assortment of fruit in the bin, while a bag of celery costing $3.70 a bunch was also in.

A shopper was left shocked after finding a green recycling bin full of produce (pictured) in good condition at the back of the Coles store in Sydney's Rose Bay.

A shopper was left shocked after finding a green recycling bin full of produce (pictured) in good condition at the back of the Coles store in Sydney’s Rose Bay.

Dozens of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes and potatoes (pictured) were in the trash

Dozens of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes and potatoes (pictured) were in the trash

He took to Facebook to slam the supermarket giant for throwing away the products and uploaded several pictures showing the discarded items.

He said the products could have been consumed by Aussies struggling to afford groceries due to the current cost of living crisis.

“Except for an overripe banana, all the produce was in excellent condition as you can clearly see in these photos,” he wrote.

“Not sure about the rest of you, but I went shopping for the family last weekend and felt sick at the cash register because of the total cost of our shopping.”

Horrified locals flooded the post with dozens of comments, many shocked by the amount of product thrown out which some described as ‘heartbreaking’.

‘Food waste is such a tragic issue when so many are starving/unable to eat nutritious food,’ one person wrote.

“This is such a huge, disgusting mess,” said another.

A bag of celery (pictured) costing $3.70 per bunch was also thrown out along with various fruits such as oranges and nectarines

A bag of celery (pictured) costing $3.70 per bunch was also thrown out along with various fruits such as oranges and nectarines

Onions (pictured) were also thrown out with the vegetables at around $4.50/kg at Coles stores

Onions (pictured) were also thrown out with the vegetables at around $4.50/kg at Coles stores

One shopper said she also found a recycling bin full of discarded fruit and vegetables after she had finished shopping at another Coles store which left her ‘shocked’.

‘Not one potato in the shop, and then a pile (of wax) on the floor that looks perfect outside! I almost stopped and grabbed some,’ she said.

A Coles spokesperson is said to have informed the man that the company was aware of the incident and said his feedback about the discarded products would be ‘reviewed’.

“We are concerned to hear of your dissatisfaction and apologize,” the spokesperson said.

“We recognize that food waste is a significant issue in Australia and support the proposed industry reform that seeks to address the problem.”

A Coles spokesperson told USA Online Post Australia the company was investigating the incident and the supermarket had initiatives in place to reduce food waste.

“As a food retailer, we love food and don’t want it to go to waste,” the spokesperson said.

‘We are proud of our partnership with food rescue organization Secondbite and Foodbank and work together in the fight against food hunger and food waste.’

A spokesperson for Coles told the USA Online Post the company was investigating the incident and said it had measures in place to reduce food waste

A spokesperson for Coles told the USA Online Post the company was investigating the incident and said it had measures in place to reduce food waste

The incident comes after farmer Guy Gaeta, a cherry and apple farmer from Orange in central NSW, called out major supermarkets, including Coles, for ‘driving up’ the prices of some fruit and vegetables.

Mr Gaeta said he goes down to the supermarket every week to see how much shoppers have to pay and is shocked by the steep price increases.

He said farmers would sell a lettuce to retailers for about $2, but the vegetable was seen on supermarket shelves with a price tag of up to $12.

Mr Gaeta criticized the move, saying consumers would be worse off if they had to spend more for their groceries.