Frightening moment pet-owner discovered one of the world’s deadliest snakes strangling her cat

A Brisbane woman found her home invaded on Wednesday by an eastern brown snake that “wrapped itself tightly” around her cat’s neck.

Rebecca Daynes posted photos of the incident to the Facebook group Snake Identification Australia, where she described the incident as ‘truly terrifying’.

She added that both the cat and snake luckily survived the fight.

“It’s been just over 24 hours now and our cat still hasn’t shown any symptoms or distress,” she said. “Not completely out of the woods yet, but we’re hopeful.”

Ms Daynes said her cat was old, debilitated and had a brain tumour, which slowed her down and meant she could not escape outside their home often.

A cat owner was horrified to find an eastern brown snake 'wrapping' itself around her pet cat's neck (pictured) while the cat was in her home in Brisbane

A cat owner was horrified to find an eastern brown snake ‘wrapping’ itself around her pet cat’s neck (pictured) while the cat was in her home in Brisbane

When she does, she ‘usually just lays in the sun waiting for someone to see the door and open it again, so we think the snake must have slipped right past her’.

Commenters on her Facebook post speculated that the snake was wrapping around the cat’s neck as a defense mechanism to protect itself from the cat’s bites.

“(The snake) was injured but still alive,” she said, although she was unable to find it after it retreated into her yard.

‘We’re returning to woodland so we assume it’s far away. Hopefully it’s will to live and death defying audacity is equal to that of our cat and they’ll both be right.’

Ms Daynes added that her cat tried to go outside again in the morning, ‘so it certainly hasn’t taught her any lessons’.

Ms Daynes removed the snake from her cat herself, which she described as an adrenaline-fuelled moment and ‘probably the stupidest thing I could have done’.

“I’m very thankful I didn’t get bitten either.”

After removing the snake from her pet cat, Ms Daynes said the reptile retreated to the garden of her home before the animal disappeared into bushland

After removing the snake from her pet cat, Ms Daynes said the reptile retreated to the garden of her home before the animal disappeared into bushland

The Facebook group is co-managed by Craig and Jackie Adams of SSSAFEwhich teaches snake and spider safety awareness and sells first aid supplies for bites.

‘Snake identification is not always simple and many factors can make identification from a photo difficult. This group will always recommend keeping a safe distance from any wild reptile and seeking immediate medical attention in the event of a snake bite,’ the group’s description reads.