Historians reveal the VERY surprising ingredient that used be part of a full English breakfast but fell out of favour over the centuries

  • Historians say it’s time for a classic fruit to be included in the English Breakfast

The English Breakfast Association has caused a stir after proposing a new addition to the country’s traditional breakfast of bacon, sausage, eggs, mushrooms and tomatoes.

According to historians, it is time for a fruit that grows far away from Britain’s wet and windy climate to be returned to the classic staple.

The fruit in question? Pineapples, of course.

The society urges diners to replace mushrooms or tomatoes with a grilled round of fresh or canned pineapples, The Telegraph reports.

In past centuries, the exotic fruit was seen as an indicator of good status and of a sophisticated taste.

The English Breakfast Association has caused a stir after proposing a new addition to the country's traditional breakfast of bacon, sausage, eggs, mushrooms and tomatoes.

The English Breakfast Association has caused a stir after proposing a new addition to the country’s traditional breakfast of bacon, sausage, eggs, mushrooms and tomatoes.

In previous centuries, pineapples were seen as an indication of good status and a sophisticated taste

In previous centuries, pineapples were seen as an indication of good status and a sophisticated taste

Guise Bule de Missenden, founder of the English Breakfast Society, insisted that pineapples had a long standing presence on England’s breakfast plates.

He said: ‘Interestingly, the pineapple was considered a high-status breakfast item in Great Britain in the late 16th and early 17th centuries.

‘Pineapples used to be considered exotic, expensive, hard to come by and were a highly prized breakfast ingredient for wealthy English families, which is why you can find many old English pineapple breakfast recipes.

‘King Charles himself loved them, so if you wanted to add a touch of the exotic to your plate and eat like a 17th century gentleman, there’s no reason not to give it a try. A slice of grilled pineapple can add variety to the English breakfast plate. Simply swap the mushrooms or tomato for a crisp pineapple slice in someone’s English breakfast one day to give them a surprising and unexpected delight.’

Despite Mr Bule de Missenden’s confidence in promoting the pineapple, his English Breakfast Association has previously ruffled some feathers among the nation’s purists.

Italian explorer Christopher Columbus is credited with first introducing pineapples to Europe after encountering them in Guadeloupe in 1493, and they quickly became the toast of the Spanish royal court.

Italian explorer Christopher Columbus is credited with first introducing pineapples to Europe after encountering them in Guadeloupe in 1493, and they quickly became the toast of the Spanish royal court.

The society has previously called for an end to hash browns at breakfast time in favor of traditional bubble and beep.

Mr Bule de Missenden defended the move, pointing to the hash brown’s origins as fast food popularized by McDonald’s.

He added: ‘Someone had to put their foot down. Otherwise we’ll soon have kebab meat in our English breakfast.’

The community’s calls were backed by dietitian Juliette Kellow, who pointed out that canned fruit is just as nutritious as fresh.

She said: ‘Canned pineapple in fruit juice is a good choice – just two rings count as one of our five daily portions.’

Italian explorer Christopher Columbus is credited with first introducing pineapples to Europe after encountering them in Guadeloupe in 1493, and they quickly became the toast of the Spanish royal court.

The fruit has also become a popular emblem in architecture as a signature of wealth and refined taste. Sir Christopher Wren incorporated them atop the towers of St Paul’s Cathedral in London towards the end of the 17th century.