I moved to Australia from America – don’t make the same mistake I did… I’ve aged 15 years

An American traveler has issued a stark warning about the brutal nature of the Australian sun.

Taylor Nunezfrom California, visiting Sydney for the first time and spent three hours lying on the beach in the sun with only sunscreen on her face.

The 21-year-old told FEMAIL she didn’t expect the sun to be so harsh and the UV level on January 29 was 12.

“I’m in Sydney Australia for the first time and didn’t realize the ozone layer doesn’t exist here,” she said in a now-viral TikTok video.

As a result, the brunette beauty was left with horrible sunburn on her legs and arms that started to peel.

Taylor Nunez, from California, was left with severe sunburn on her hands and arms after visiting Sydney for the first time

The 21-year-old was not aware of the hole in the ozone layer that Australia has (sunburn in the photo)

Taylor Nunez, from California, (left) was left with severe sunburn on her hands and arms after visiting Sydney for the first time. The 21-year-old was not aware of the hole in the ozone layer that Australia has (sunburn in the photo on the right)

On January 29, the brunette beauty lay in the sun on the beach for three hours

On January 29, the brunette beauty lay in the sun on the beach for three hours

Taylor said she only put sunscreen on her face – as she does daily – and the UV levels were up earlier in the day.

However, her skin fell victim to the fierce Australian sun and she shared what the sunburn looked like in a TikTok video almost a week later.

‘How does this happen? I think I’ve added about 15 years of aging to my legs because of this,’ she said in the clip.

‘My arm isn’t much better either, or my chest, or the back of my legs, it’s all really bad.

“If you have any tips other than aloe it would be greatly appreciated as I need all the help I can get.”

“I’m in Sydney Australia for the first time and didn’t realize the ozone layer doesn’t exist here,” she said in a now-viral TikTok video

The video has since been viewed a staggering 6.3 million times and the burns have left others in disbelief.

“Oh my god, I’ve never seen a fire like that and I’m Australian!” one person commented.

‘It looks so painful,’ another said, a third added: ‘Girl the sun here is no joke, SPF always,’

Now Taylor is on a mission to encourage other travelers to wear SPF 50+ when Down Under.

“When you visit Australia, you need to buy Australian sunscreen and be a lot more careful about the sun,” Taylor told FEMAIL.

“The hole in the ozone layer makes the UV much stronger that my skin is not used to, even from the California sun.”

Cancer Council recommends applying sunscreen 20 minutes before going outside and again every two hours.

When UV levels are three or higher, most Australians get enough vitamin D with just a few minutes of sun exposure while completing daily tasks such as walking to the local shops.

Since sunscreen can easily be wiped off, lost through sweat, you should also reapply after swimming, sweating or towel drying.

Too much sun exposure can increase your chance of developing life-threatening skin cancer.

HOW TO USE SUNSCREEN CORRECTLY:

* Put it on clean, dry skin 15 to 30 minutes before you go out in the sun to give it time to react with your skin. Reapply just before going out – you’ll increase the amount applied and be more likely to get the stated SPF benefit.

* Cover all parts of the body not protected by clothing (don’t forget your ears, the back of your neck, the back of your hands and the top of your feet).

* Apply it evenly, and don’t rub it in excessively – most sunscreens will absorb into the outer layer of skin and don’t need to be rubbed in vigorously.

* Reapply at least once every two hours and after swimming or exercise.

* Think beyond the beach and pool – use sunscreen whenever you’re going to be outdoors for a long time, such as to the park, a lunchtime walk to the shops, sports or gardening.

* Store your sunscreen at a temperature of less than 30 degrees Celsius. If you leave it in the glove box of your car or in the sun, it can lose its effectiveness. Keep it in the air with the drinks, in the shade or wrapped in a towel.

* Do not use sunscreen products that have passed their expiry date as they may have lost their effectiveness.

Source: Choice