Ice Arena, Adelaide: AFL player Marcus Bontempelli’s partner among ice hockey players hospitalised after carbon monoxide poisoning

The partner of an AFL star was among dozens of top ice hockey players hospitalized with carbon monoxide poisoning after a leak at an ice rink.

Neila Brenning, the partner of Western Bulldogs AFL player Marcus Bontempelli was among nearly 40 patients who fell ill after attending Ice Arena in Thebarton on Saturday.

Most of the victims were attending or playing in an Australian Women’s Ice Hockey League match between Melbourne Ice and home team Adelaide Rush at the arena on Saturday afternoon.

The court was also used by the public before the game.

Fire crews were called to the scene later that night, where they detected ‘high levels’ of carbon monoxide in atmospheric tests and had to use hired pressure fans and ventilation to clear it.

Brenning, who plays for the visiting team, took a selfie of herself in a wheelchair at Adelaide Airport on Sunday surrounded by two teammates.

“Oh what a night,” she captioned the selfie on Instagram Stories.

As an official investigation was launched, the venue has since revealed that a fault in the zamboni – a machine used to smooth the ice before games – was responsible for the leak.

Most of the victims were attending or playing in an Australian Women's Ice Hockey League match between Melbourne Ice and home team Adelaide Rush (pictured) at Thebarton Arena on Saturday afternoon when they were rushed to hospital.

Most of the victims were attending or playing in an Australian Women’s Ice Hockey League match between Melbourne Ice and home team Adelaide Rush (pictured) at Thebarton Arena on Saturday afternoon when they were rushed to hospital.

“There was some carbon monoxide detected and it appears to be coming from the Zamboni,” said driver Richard Laidlaw The Advertiser.

“That machine is out of order immediately, but we have a backup machine.”

The zamboni has since been taken out of service.

The ice rink was closed on Sunday, but is expected to reopen on Monday.

It is understood that players from both teams started to fall ill in the middle of the match.

“During the game, which started at 16:45 local time, many players from the Melbourne Ice and Rush teams became unwell,” a spokesperson for Ice Hockey Australia said.

“Players from both teams were taken to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning.”

‘Our thoughts are with all those affected. We wish all those affected a speedy recovery.

“We understand the authorities are working with the venue to thoroughly investigate the incident.”

South Australia Health reported that 38 people aged between 17 and 40 presented to hospital in the early hours of Sunday morning with a range of symptoms including headache, fatigue, dizziness and nausea.

All patients are in stable condition and are expected to make a full recovery.

SA Health’s chief public health officer, Professor Nicola Spurrier, said some patients required oxygen therapy.

Melbourne Ice player Neila Brenning took a selfie with teammates Danielle Butler and Stephanie Conlon at Adelaide Airport

Melbourne Ice player Neila Brenning took a selfie with teammates Danielle Butler and Stephanie Conlon at Adelaide Airport

Fire crews (pictured) were called to the rink where they detected carbon monoxide and used rental pressure fans and ventilation to clear it

Fire crews (pictured) were called to the rink where they detected carbon monoxide and used rental pressure fans and ventilation to clean it up

Venue manager Richard Laidlaw revealed that a faulty Zamboni - a machine used to smooth the ice before games - was to blame for the leak (picture: the Zamboni in action at half-time)

Venue manager Richard Laidlaw revealed that a faulty Zamboni – a machine used to smooth the ice before games – was to blame for the leak (picture: the Zamboni in action at half-time)

Anyone who experiences symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning after visiting the ice skating rink is urged to seek medical attention.

“Anyone still experiencing symptoms should get a medical check-up today,” Professor Spurrier said in a statement.

“People who are pregnant and very young babies are advised to seek a medical examination today, regardless of symptoms.”

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, fatigue, nausea and, in more severe cases, shortness of breath.

Young children, people who are pregnant, the elderly, and those with chronic illnesses such as heart and lung disease are at greater risk of health impacts from carbon monoxide poisoning.

The venue was closed on Sunday but is expected to reopen on Monday

The venue was closed on Sunday but is expected to reopen on Monday