Maddie and Ante’s real estate agent made them jump through a series of bizarre hoops before they could put down an offer on their dream home – and you won’t believe what he did in the end

A couple have been left fuming after an estate agent made them jump through a series of bizarre hoops to put down an offer on a house – before being cruelly turned down.

Sydney woman Maddie Langshaw (25) and her fiance Ante Jungbluth Miocic (30) have been looking for a house on the NSW Central Coast for months.

They found the perfect property online but were unable to visit because they both work long hours and weekend shifts in the marketing industry.

Ms Langshaw asked her parents to inspect it, and they came back with glowing reviews and suggested it would be the perfect buy for their daughter.

But the estate agent refused to sell to the couple until they met a series of demands which included driving an hour to inspect the property themselves.

He then had the gall to ask them to write a ‘love letter’ about the house to the daughter of the late home owner explaining how perfect it was and their future plans as a couple.

Maddie Langshaw (25) and her fiance Ante Jungbluth Miocic (30), who live in Sydney, have been looking for property on NSW's Central Coast for months

Maddie Langshaw (25) and her fiance Ante Jungbluth Miocic (30), who live in Sydney, have been looking for property on NSW’s Central Coast for months

The couple made an offer – before it was rejected – which sparked a mixed reaction of anger and shock and left them feeling they had been ‘played’.

Ms Langshaw has been saving for a home since she was 14, but says she is now losing hope of ever owning a property.

‘I’ve been pretty beat since then. It gets really exhausting,” she told USA Online Post Australia.

The couple said they were on the phone with Ms Langshaw’s parents during the inspection.

“They said it was structurally sound, we could do a lot with it and it was under budget,” Ms Langshaw said.

The couple texted the estate agent with their offer the same day before he called them back.

He said the house belonged to a man who died and his daughter was the seller.

“He said she wouldn’t sell to us unless we saw the house face to face,” Ms Langshaw said.

“We fell for it because we knew the woman would have a personal connection if it was her father’s house.”

Maddie has been saving for a house deposit since starting work at 14, after seeing both her parents struggle to buy houses later in life

Maddie has been saving for a house deposit since starting work at 14, after seeing both her parents struggle to buy houses later in life

The couple were in the middle of grocery shopping, but immediately jumped in their car and drove an hour north after the real estate agent said he had a dinner to go to and couldn’t meet them later.

“Maybe I’m naive because I thought he was a genuine guy,” Ms Langshaw said.

“He said he was close to the owner, had sold previous properties for him and had a personal connection.”

Ms Langshaw found herself torn by the stories the agent told as they ‘really tugged at my heartstrings’ and reminded her that she lost her grandfather at 19.

“I was invested at that point,” she said.

Ms Langshaw said the estate agent spoke to the couple as if they already had the house and told them their offer was the best one.

“He said, “Men, you can cut down this tree. You can expand there,” she said.

‘When we left he told us our offer was great. But we said to write a letter to the owner about what our vision is for the property, about our future and about us.

‘He said the seller wanted to know. We thought it was strange, but it was her father’s house and we really wanted it.’

The estate agent insisted that they inspect the property so that they were attached to it, had them write a personal letter about what their plans were for the house, their future plans and who they were.  He also told them their offer was at the 'top mark' but then told them to offer more

The estate agent insisted that they inspect the property so that they were attached to it, had them write a personal letter about what their plans were for the house, their future plans and who they were. He also told them their offer was at the ‘top mark’ but then told them to offer more

The couple spent an hour on the letter and said it was so personal that they did not want to make its contents public.

The prospective home buyers submitted the letter with their offer – and then the estate agent fell silent.

The couple said they had not received an acknowledgment email and decided to call the estate agent first on Monday – but he did not pick up the phone.

“He finally called and said, ‘I thought you guys would send a higher offer after seeing it on Saturday,'” Ms Langshaw said.

The agent then gave them an amount and told them to make an offer ‘north’ of that which prompted the couple to add an extra $5,000 to their offer.

Ms Langshaw and Mr Miocic were stunned after receiving a call informing them the house had been sold to another buyer – who offered $5,000 more.

“We would have offered more but he didn’t tell us or give us the opportunity,” Ms Langshaw said.

The news was a blow to the couple, who are already struggling with high rent payments with the cost of their one-bedroom apartment set to increase by $100 next week.

‘We can’t even get into the market. We have a deposit, we have approval, but we are getting confused,” Ms Langshaw said.

She said she has been saving since she was a teenager and encouraged her partner to do the same after they met a few years ago.

‘I come from a single parent household. I saw both my parents struggle to buy a house when they were in their late 30s and 40s,’ Ms Langshaw said.

“I wanted to set myself up.”

Originally from the Central Coast, Ms Langshaw moved to Sydney when she was 21 for her career, sacrificing a lot for her deposit, including living in share houses.

But she loves where she grew up.

The couple, who both work long hours and many weekends in marketing, had their hopes dashed when the agent haunted them, only to eventually inform them that the house had been sold to someone else

The couple, who both work long hours and many weekends in marketing, had their hopes dashed when the agent haunted them, only to eventually inform them that the house had been sold to someone else

“When we got engaged recently, I wanted to move back because we started thinking about our future and possible children and we wanted to be close to my parents, surrounded by family – and have a plot.”

Ray White Parramatta’s asset and sales manager Amir Jahan told USA Online Post Australia he suspected the estate agent was using a blocking tactic on the couple.

‘Some agents want to buy time. The reason is if their first offer falls through, they have a back-up buyer,’ he said.

“It sounds like as soon as the first offer went through they spat out the second buyer.”

He said he would never tell any buyers to write a letter about themselves or have them come inspect it if they were lucky.

‘It’s a basic process. Yes to accept. No to reject. Every single offer we get we respect the buyer.

‘For every buyer, this is big money. It’s money they’ve saved for their whole lives.

‘As an agent, it doesn’t matter if it’s a high offer or a low offer, agents must tell the owner of all offers or interested parties.’

Mr Jahan suspects the agent probably had a high offer and was only using the couple.

“He had them on the hook to wait until he saw what would happen with the first buyer,” he said.

Real Estate Institute of NSW chief executive Tim McKibbin told USA Online Post Australia he had never heard of an agent asking a prospective buyer to write such a letter.

‘This is extremely unusual. I’ve been in the business for more years than I care to remember, and I’ve never heard of this before,” he said.

‘If it is a condition of the seller, the agent has an obligation to pass on the request (to write a letter), but this is very unusual.’

Mr McKibbin said the moral of the story was “you’ve got nothing until you’ve exchanged the contract” – and advised buyers to exchange as soon as possible after doing their due diligence.

‘And that’s true if it’s a first home buyer or someone buying the MLC building in Sydney.’