Miraculous find after terminally ill woman’s brother lost the precious heirloom ring she planned to leave to her infant son when she passed: ‘My aim is to make it to his 1st birthday’

A ‘Hail Mary’ social media miracle has returned the ring a dying mother intended to give her baby son as a memento of her enduring love.

Bella Ainsworth (29) was diagnosed with an incurable cancer only weeks after the birth of her son Saf and was given just months to live.

The ring is part of a treasure trove of gifts and messages she is preparing for Saf to receive posthumously from her over the coming years.

Sadly, her brother Matt James Allan left the ring, which is part of a matching pair ordered by Ms Ainsworth’s best friend, on a Melbourne train last Tuesday.

Fortunately, the ring specially made as a memento of a dying mother to her infant son was found

Fortunately, the ring specially made as a memento of a dying mother to her infant son was found

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After a week of desperate searches, including calling the police and public transport, Ms. Ainsworth gave up trying to get the precious group back.

“I had no faith,” Ms Ainsworth said.

‘You only need half a brain to realize it’s expensive, it’s a fully gold band.

‘We embedded my fingerprints into the ring and it includes four special stones that mean something to me.

“My girlfriend spared nothing, bless her cotton socks.”

Her distraught brother, who last saw the ring in its box on the seat next to him at South Yarra station shortly before she got off the 3.50pm express train to Melbourne’s south-east, was desperate to make amends.

“That’s why it was all so poignant,” Ms Ainsworth said.

“My brother went ‘I’ll pay for a replacement’ and I went ‘I don’t think you can afford it honey.’

To their surprise after putting the mail out, they were contacted earlier in the week by a man who found it on the train.

“He didn’t trust the lost and found it where everyone could grab it,” Ms Ainsworth said.

The ring still had the Melbourne jeweler’s mark on it, so he contacted them but never saw the return message.

“So he didn’t give chase,” Ms Ainsworth said.

‘Then he saw the Facebook post and he said it was definitely the ring.

“My brother met him and he picked it up earlier today and is on his way to Shepparton, which is where we are now.”

Last June, Ms Ainsworth was diagnosed with Cholangiocarcinoma cancer, which affects her liver, gallbladder and bile ducts, with doctors giving her just 12 months to live under treatment.

Bella Ainsworth (pictured centre, with family members including brother Matt, back right) received the devastating news that she had a rare and terminal cancer just weeks after giving birth to her first son

Bella Ainsworth (pictured centre, with family members including brother Matt, back right) received the devastating news that she had a rare and terminal cancer just weeks after giving birth to her first son

With the tumor not working, the only hope was a liver transplant and only one doctor, a surgeon in Sydney, was willing to do the operation.

“They were willing to take me on, everyone else said ‘no, it’s too risky,'” Ms Ainsworth said.

However, in November, a preparatory procedure delivered the devastating news that the cancer had spread beyond the liver.

“It was my worst day,” Ms Ainsworth said.

“We had hope up until that point.”

Ms Ainsworth and her husband Mitch Barrett have returned to their hometown of Shepparton in north-east Victoria, where she is undergoing chemotherapy and immunotherapy, but with no hope of long-term remission.

“We’ve accepted our situation, we still fight, but we spend all our time together building memories and living life,” Ms Ainsworth said.

‘I’m taking treatment well and everything is going pretty well, so fingers crossed we stretch it out bit by bit.

“He (Mr Barrett) and I have our coping mechanisms which are mainly humour.”

Ms Ainsworth (pictured with husband Mitch Barrett and nine-year-old Saf) says she is busy preparing birthday presents and letters for her son until he is 21

Ms Ainsworth (pictured with husband Mitch Barrett and nine-year-old Saf) says she is busy preparing birthday presents and letters for her son until he is 21

Ms Ainsworth said her quality of life was currently good.

“When I’m healthy, it’s very easy to be upbeat,” she said.

‘You wouldn’t know to look at me, apart from my hair and a few other things, that anything is really off.

“It’s when I’m really sick that reality sets in and it’s not so great.”

She said that being able to be close to Saf also helped keep her alive.

‘When I’m around him I find it easy because a baby is a huge distraction. He’s cute and fun,” she said.

‘He is a very happy baby. We were very happy. He sleeps well, all those things we are blessed with in that regard.

‘He’s about to walk, he’s crawling, he’s saying goo goo, ga ga, mamma, dadda kind of stuff.

“My goal is to make it to his first birthday in May – that’s our big milestone and my 30th.”

Ms Ainsworth only learned of her condition when an observant midwife noticed that she seemed to be doing poorly after having Saf.

‘She said to me, “you don’t bounce back in the normal way.” I thought it was all normal after pregnancy,’ Ms Ainsworth said.

On the advice of the midwife, Ms Ainsworth went to hospital for blood tests.

“It took them a couple of weeks to figure it out,” she said.

“We thought it was going to be an easy fix, something small, because it started as a blood clot that turned out to be a tumor.”

She describes the next few months of being both a new mother and a terminal cancer patient as a ‘whirlwind’, but said the lowest points were when she couldn’t parent Saf.

“I had a big blood transfusion,” she said.

‘After that I couldn’t even hold him, couldn’t breastfeed, couldn’t do anything.

Ms Ainsworth said having a baby was a 'huge distraction' from her condition because he is so 'cute and fun'

Ms Ainsworth said having a baby was a ‘huge distraction’ from her condition because he is so ‘cute and fun’

“That was what I found most terrible.”

“When I was in and out of hospital, you could go weeks at a time without seeing him, so I found it difficult.”

As for the ring, she intends for Saf to get it on his 21st birthday.

However, she is preparing many other things to give him before that date.

“My sister-in-law got me this beautiful teddy that you can record with,” she said.

‘I read him books and his favorite nursery rhymes that he laughs with at the moment.

‘We are organizing all his birthday presents until he is 21.

“I also write a letter for each year.”

A GoFundMe page to help with Ms. Ainsworth’s medical expenses was set up by Ms. Ainsworth’s sister-in-law Elle Griffin and by Wednesday afternoon had raised nearly $170,000 since it was launched in August.

“If you know Bella, then you are one of the lucky ones and you won’t be surprised that she was chosen to do everything in her power to beat it,” Ms Griffith wrote of the brave mother.

In its latest update from January, the tab said: ‘Bella is still kicking cancer’s ass and looking so beautiful doing it (honestly, how does she do it)’.

“Chemo is back in full swing and luckily there have been more good days than bad,” writes Ms Griffin.

“It was a magical holiday season making memories with all of her most precious loved ones.”

Ms Bella said if she had been able to undergo the liver transplant it would have meant spending a year in Sydney rather than being back in Shepparton.

“It’s a blessing that I was able to stay with my support network, but not a blessing that my only option for a cure was taken away,” she said.

“Our close family is amazing, they’ve been absolutely brilliant but didn’t realize we had so many other allies and other supporters. That regional heart is very strong.

“We were absolutely blown away (by the support). It’s really hard to describe.’