NYT author and college administrators blame GENDER discrimination for female leaders of prestigious universities being hauled before Congress where they refused to denounce anti-Semitism leading to ouster of UPenn and Harvard presidents

College administrators and academics have said sexism played a role in the ousting of the Harvard and Penn presidents after they – along with another female university president – were brought before Congress, where they refused to address anti-Semitism. to denounce the campus.

Claudine Gay and Liz Magill were both forced to resign after being called before Congress on 5 December. When asked whether calling for the genocide of Jews violated their universities’ codes of conduct, they refused to say no, instead saying it was context-dependent.

Now academics and college administrators have suggested that sexism played a role in their expulsion.

New York University professor emerita Madeline Heilman told the New York Times’ Kate Zernike: ‘If they both start well and one man does poorly, people offer excuses and other reasons before seeing it as an indication of how he is

‘For a woman it fits the stereotype of not qualified. What is seen as a mistake for men is a fatal mistake for a woman.’

Dr.  Claudine Gay, Liz Magill, Dr.  Pamela Nadell and Dr.  Sally Kornbluth testified before Congress on December 5th

Dr. Claudine Gay, Liz Magill, Dr. Pamela Nadell and Dr. Sally Kornbluth testified before Congress on December 5th

The four presidents summoned before Congress – Gay, Magill, Kornbluth and Minouche Shafik, who did not attend citing a previous commitment – are all women. Dr. Pamela Nadell, the former president of the Association of Jewish Studies, also testified.

They were all less than two years in their roles.

Dr. Nancy Andrews, who was the first female dean of Duke Medical School, told the Times: ‘Four women presidents, all new to their roles, far too new to shape the culture on their campuses, called before Congress? Of course there is a pattern.

‘The question is: What is the agenda? Is it to take down women leaders? Attacking elite universities through a perceived vulnerability? To advance a political goal?’

Neither the male president of Yale nor the University of Chicago, where pro-Palestinian groups also held protests, were called to attend the hearing.

In an interview with the Yale Daily News the day after the Congressional hearing, Yale President Peter Salovey said he was “unsure” why he was not asked to attend.

When asked how he would have answered the question, he said he ‘would want to look at the whole evidence first.’

He later updated his response to say: ‘What has been asked of other university leaders during recent congressional hearings has raised questions about our policies and practices. Let me be clear by stating our vigorous rejection of discrimination and prejudice at Yale.’

A group known as "Brand Claudine Gay" deployed a panel truck with an electronic billboard display outside the Harvard campus with a message protesting against Gay

A group known as ‘Fire Claudine Gay’ deployed a panel truck with an electronic billboard display outside the Harvard campus with a message protesting Gay

Author Kate Zernike asked in a New York Times article: 'Would a man have been treated the same way?'

Author Kate Zernike asked in a New York Times article: ‘Would a man have been treated the same way?’

Dr. Andrews reviewed federal discrimination complaints filed against colleges and universities since the start of 2022.

She reportedly found that 80 percent of complaints were made against institutions run by women, despite only 30 percent of presidents being female.

Harvard law professor Nancy Gertner told the Times, “If there were three men at that table, it wouldn’t have gone from ‘poor performance’ to ‘you’re not qualified.’

Kate Zernike, who wrote about gender discrimination in academia in her recent book, The Exceptions, wrote in the Times: ‘Yes, there may have been plagiarism, in the case of Dr. Gay, and the issue of race to consider.

“Yes, the presidents sounded so legitimate, so coached, during the trial: Why couldn’t they more passionately state their opposition to slogans that encourage genocide?

“But then there are the suspicions in the other direction: If the issue was security, why didn’t Congress summon the (male) presidents of Yale and the University of Chicago, where pro-Palestinian groups occupied quads and administrative offices ?

“Underlying all the conversations was the most maddening, familiar and ultimately unanswerable question of all: Would a man have been treated the same way?”

Magill resigned shortly after the Dec. 5 hearing, saying her comments were taken out of context, but Gay held firm.

Gay said: ‘There are some who have confused a right to free expression with the idea that Harvard would condone calls for violence against Jewish students.

Students flew a 'Harvard Hates Jews' sign across campus on December 7 - two days after Gay's testimony

Students flew a ‘Harvard Hates Jews’ sign across campus on December 7 – two days after Gay’s testimony

Students protest against Israel on October 14 at Harvard University.  Many Jewish students said the widespread protests and university response to them made them feel unsafe

Students protest against Israel at Harvard University on October 14. Many Jewish students said the widespread protests and university response to them made them feel unsafe

“Let me be clear: Calls for violence or genocide against the Jewish community, or any religious or ethnic group, are vile, they have no place at Harvard, and those who threaten our Jewish students will be held accountable,” she said. at the time.

The Harvard Corporation stood by her and resisted the growing calls for her resignation.

Since the trial on December 5, she has been accused of plagiarism throughout her academic career.

On December 12, after the first plagiarism claims emerged, Harvard stood by her again, insisting that she be investigated and cleared.

Critics said it was a “sham” investigation that opened and closed too quickly.