Outrage as North Carolina police department puts ailing K-9 named Pac-Man in SHELTER instead of letting him retire with his handler, even after he offered to buy him

Anger has flooded a local police department in North Carolina after police put a sick K-9 German Shepherd named Pac-Man in a shelter instead of letting him go down with his former handler step.

Police K-9 Pac-Man, 7 years old, has been sleeping in the kennel at a shelter since last November, despite his former handler Nathan Ingram offering to buy him.

Ingram has worked with Pac-Man at the Dunn Police Department in North Carolina for the past three years, but he was on light duty and recovering from an injury last October.

But during an unexpected phone call, Dunn Police Chief Cary Jackson told Ingram that she was taking his faithful companion to the Dunn Animal Shelter.

Ingram offered to cover the costs for Pac-Man, who had joint pain and anxiety, if he was allowed to retire and live with him, but the chief refused.

Police K-9 Pac-Man, 7 years old, has been sleeping in the kennel at a shelter since last November, despite his former handler Nathan Ingram (right) offering to buy him

Police K-9 Pac-Man, 7 years old, has been sleeping in the kennel at a shelter since last November, despite his former handler Nathan Ingram (right) offering to buy him

Ingram has worked with Pac-Man at the Dunn Police Department in North Carolina for the past three years, but he was on light duty recovering from an injury last October

Ingram has worked with Pac-Man at the Dunn Police Department in North Carolina for the past three years, but he was on light duty recovering from an injury last October

Dunn Police Chief Cary Jackson told Ingram that she was taking his faithful companion to the Dunn Animal Shelter

Pac-Man pictured in shelter

Ingram offered to cover the costs for Pac-Man, who had joint pain and anxiety, if he was allowed to retire and live with him, but the chief refused.

‘He went to work with me every day I worked, he came home with me, stayed at my house every night, for three years. And then suddenly he was taken,” Ingram said CBS.

‘Of course he doesn’t have a voice for himself. I can only imagine that I just don’t know what’s going on, like hey, why am I here so long?’ Ingram added.

Ingram, who has since left the department for a new job, claimed that removing Pac-Man from his car was an act of retaliation for his absence during a department photo shoot with the dog.

But Jackson disputed that, saying Pac-Man was sent to the shelter because Ingram’s injury wouldn’t allow him to care for the dog.

Jackson said: ‘It’s simply not true. We’re not going to get into the back and forth.’

“Based on the restrictions issued to him by his physician, we made the decision to remove the handler from him so he could make sure he was receiving appropriate care.”

Ingram dismissed the claim, saying: ‘I was fully capable of taking care of Pac-Man during this time. It has not been removed from my home because it is being portrayed to the public.’

Police K-9 Pac-Man, 7 years old, has been sleeping in the kennel at a shelter since last November

Police K-9 Pac-Man, 7 years old, has been sleeping in the kennel at a shelter since last November

Ingram, who has since left the department for a new job, claimed that removing Pac-Man from his car was an act of retaliation for his absence during a department photo shoot with the dog

Ingram, who has since left the department for a new job, claimed that removing Pac-Man from his car was an act of retaliation for his absence during a department photo shoot with the dog

But Jackson disputed that, saying Pac-Man was sent to the shelter because Ingram's injury wouldn't allow him to care for the dog

But Jackson disputed that, saying Pac-Man was sent to the shelter because Ingram’s injury wouldn’t allow him to care for the dog

The heartbroken former officer mentioned that his companion is known to have leg problems, suffer from anxiety and is in poor medical condition.

But the department refused to allow Pac-Man to retire, Ingram said, stressing that this is not the first time such an incident has occurred within the same police department.

“I just want Pac-Man to come home and would be forever grateful if he could retire and enjoy the last few years he may have left,” Ingram said local news station WRAL.

Insisting the dog is capable of working, the chief described Pac-Man as “a healthy, loved and respected member” of the agency.

“We feel that he is fully competent based on our consultation with our veterinarian and police trainers, dog trainers,” Jackson said.

“It would be an injustice for K-9 Apacs to retire and not be able to do what he lives for, which is work and provide a service to the city of Dunn,” she said.

The heartbroken former officer mentioned that his companion is known to have leg problems, suffer from anxiety and is in poor medical condition

The heartbroken former officer mentioned that his companion is known to have leg problems, suffer from anxiety and is in poor medical condition

The chief insisted that the dog was capable of working

The chief described Pac-Man as

But the department refused to allow Pac-Man to retire, Ingram said, stressing that this is not the first time such an incident has occurred within the same police department.

In a lengthy statement released by the police department last week, Jackson said Pac-Man has been medically cleared and will begin his training soon.

“Appropriate training for this K-9 officer/handler and Apacs has been arranged and will begin next week at no additional cost to the taxpayers of Dunn,” she said.

“All of the previously mentioned care for Dunn PD’s K-9 Apacs was necessitated by the former K-9 officer’s voluntary separation from the Dunn Police Department,” Jackson writes.

‘K-9 Apacs have never been “abandoned” at the Dunn Animal Shelter. He was personally groomed and medically cleared to continue his service as a working police dog.’

The agency has not specified who will be the next handler for Pac-Man, leading to conflicting information in local reports.

The police dog was reportedly moved to the custody and care of Courtney Hayter, director of Dunn’s animal control, when Ingram was placed on medical leave last year.

He was then moved to a climate-controlled kennel at the shelter when Hayter began basic law enforcement training in January.

Officer NA Blanchard is reported to be his new handler, as mentioned by the Daily Recordbut he is still waiting for a kennel to be built at his house.

However, other local media claim that Sgt. Adam Sikorski will become the new handler as he said it is time to move on.

Sikorski told WARL: ‘This is what he lives for – work, find drugs, find bad guys. We start training on Monday, which we are very excited about.’

In a lengthy statement released by the police department last week, Jackson said Pac-Man has been medically cleared and will begin his training soon

In a lengthy statement released by the police department last week, Jackson said Pac-Man has been medically cleared and will begin his training soon

The agency has not specified who will be the next handler for Pac-Man, leading to conflicting information in local reports

The agency has not specified who will be the next handler for Pac-Man, leading to conflicting information in local reports

According to a post shared by an account called ‘Pac-Man Retire K-9 Officer APAC’, the police dog was assigned to its third handler for training last week.

The petition to allow Pac-Man has since drawn overwhelming responses from social media users, including some local residents who even attended the city’s council meeting last week to voice their concerns.

Johnnie Jackson, who has worked with dogs in law enforcement, including with the Dunn police, is one of the people advocating for Pac-Man’s retirement.

‘The way K-9 Pacman was treated by Chief Cary Jackson infuriates me. I have lost all respect for the leadership of the Dunn Police Department and its counsel.

“The moves allowed with this 7-year-old dog lack any common sense or heart,” he added.

“For this dog to be in a shelter for two months and now all of a sudden in a week, he’s thrown with a handler, and in another week it’s in a school, in my opinion it’s too much an old dog,’ he said at the city council meeting.

‘It’s like I stayed in the same profession for 49 years, or you did, and then suddenly I’m thrown out where I had to run like before, and jump like before, because when they go to school, it’s not an easy school .’

DailyMail.com has reached out to the Dunn Police Department for comment and further information.