Poison seller linked to 93 British deaths has been charged with 14 counts of first-degree murder in Canada

Poison dealer Kenneth Law, who is linked to the deaths of 93 Britons, has been charged with first-degree murder.

Law, 57, was originally charged in December with 14 counts of second-degree murder after he allegedly sold 1,200 packages of lethal drugs over the Internet to people in 40 countries between late 2020 and April 2023.

But now his lawyer, Matthew Gourlay, has confirmed the charges have been upgraded to first-degree murder, according to The Times.

Law is due to appear in court in Canada next week and will plead not guilty to the charges, Gourlay said. If convicted, he will automatically face life in prison.

The so-called dealer of death has been charged with a total of 28 offenses related to 14 victims in Ontario, but he is linked to the deaths of 124 worldwide, including the 93 in Britain.

Poison dealer Kenneth Law who is linked to the deaths of 124 people including 93 Britons

Poison dealer Kenneth Law who is linked to the deaths of 124 people including 93 Britons

Kenneth Law appears in court in Brampton, Ontario on Wednesday, May 3, 2023

Kenneth Law appears in court in Brampton, Ontario on Wednesday, May 3, 2023

Law was arrested in May this year in Ontario, USA, and was initially charged with two counts of counseling and assisting suicide. In August, he received a further 12 charges of counseling or assisting suicide.

Outside Canada, the National Crime Agency said it had launched its own investigation into the deaths of 93 people in the UK who bought drugs online to help with suicide.

In total, 288 individuals in the UK were identified as having allegedly purchased products from the websites over a two-year period to April 2023.

The NCA initially said it had identified just 272 individuals, 88 of whom had died, but they have since raised their estimates.

A spokesman for the NCA said: ‘We are investigating possible criminal wrongdoing in relation to the deaths of 93 individuals who purchased drugs to assist suicide from these websites.

‘Following the initial list of 272 individuals, we have recently received further information from Canadian authorities about a further 16 purchases made in the UK during the same period. Three of them unfortunately died in the meantime.’

Law’s alleged victims included teenagers and young adults in their 20s and 30s.

Anthony Jones, a 17-year-old from Michigan, was one of Law’s alleged victims.

“It was 3 a.m. and he ran into his mother’s room screaming and begging to call 911,” New York lawyer Carrie Goldberg told CTV News Toronto.

He ran to his mother screaming ‘I want to live’ after taking the drug, which eventually killed him, the initial investigation revealed.

In Britain, Tom Parfett (22), Michael Dunham (38), Neha Raju (23), Imogen Nunn (25) and a 21-year-old student are said to have died after buying products from Law’s company.

Anthony Jones, a 17-year-old from Michigan, was one of Law's alleged victims.  His mother said he died after ingesting sodium nitrite he bought online

Anthony Jones, a 17-year-old from Michigan, was one of Law’s alleged victims. His mother said he died after ingesting sodium nitrite he bought online

Tom Parfett (22) was a British university student who enjoyed watching football and had a passion for Lego.  He allegedly died after buying a lethal drug from Law

Tom Parfett (22) was a British university student who enjoyed watching football and had a passion for Lego. He allegedly died after buying a lethal drug from Law

Imogen Nunn (25), known as Deaf Immy on the TikTok social media platform, where she raised hearing and mental health issues, is said to have died after Kenneth Law sent the kit.

Imogen Nunn (25), known as Deaf Immy on the TikTok social media platform, where she raised hearing and mental health issues, is said to have died after Kenneth Law sent the kit.

Berkshire-born father Mr Parfett said: ‘I believe my son would still be alive if it wasn’t for this man and this substance.’

A mother whose 20-year-old daughter was also poisoned after buying a drug from Law told British police about him months before he was charged.

The woman, who has not been named, emailed the Metropolitan Police’s chemical reporting team in August 2021 after losing her daughter who bought a lethal drug from Law and later took her own life , according to The Times.

The mother, who was reportedly told by the Met that they would alert the Home Office, criticized the force. She told The Times: ‘I’m disgusted they didn’t take it further. They did nothing and more people died. It’s a sham.’

The woman said her daughter bought a drug from Law a month before her death on July 15, 2021.

Even after her death, she sent a message to the chef himself, pleading with him to stop selling the deadly drug.

The mother then emailed the chemical reporting team, a Met counterterrosim unit, on August 17, telling them that her daughter had taken a drug from Law’s company.

Her email said: ‘I would be grateful if you could please prevent this drug from getting past customs and the country, especially in large quantities and especially to individuals who do not own a food business.

“I can’t tell you how sad I am that my 20-year-old daughter passed away because it’s easy to get this drug.

“I would hate for anyone else to suffer the pain I suffer.”

The unit responded saying they were ‘aware of similar tragic circumstances’ surrounding the substance. However, they added that it is legal to buy in the UK.

It said it would pass the mother’s email ‘to the relevant team at the Home Office’ and stressed that it ‘takes the matter … very seriously’.

Law, of Mississauga, Ontario, is also being investigated by police in the United States, Italy, Australia and New Zealand.