Seven former workers at Elon Musk’s SpaceX claim company execs discriminated against women, joked about sexual harassment and fired workers when they complained about it

  • According to the complaint, which was first reported by Bloomberg, the workers were fired by the company in 2022 after a letter circulated by SpaceX that was critical of Musk.

A group of seven former employees at Elon Musk’s SpaceX say the rocket and satellite company discriminated against women while making jokes about sexual harassment and even fired those who complained, according to a new civil rights complaint.

According to the complaint, first reported by Bloomberg, the workers were fired by the company in 2022 after letter a circulated by SpaceX that was critical of Musk.

The group says SpaceX violated California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act, which protects workers critical of their management.

The California Civil Rights Department first contacted SpaceX about the allegations in January.

SpaceX was sued in October by a female former employee who claimed the company paid and promoted women and minorities less than white men.

The California Civil Rights Department first contacted SpaceX about the allegations in January

The California Civil Rights Department first contacted SpaceX about the allegations in January

SpaceX logo is displayed on a building at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral on May 26, 2020.

SpaceX logo is displayed on a building at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral on May 26, 2020.

Former SpaceX engineer Ashley Foltz filed a proposed class action in the state of California last year, saying the company paid her $92,000 a year while men with similar duties and qualifications were paid up to $115,000.

California law prohibits employers from paying workers less than colleagues performing “substantially similar work” based on their gender, race or ethnicity.

Foltz said she discovered the discrepancy when SpaceX posted job openings for engineering positions with a salary range of $95,000 to $115,000.

A California pay transparency law went into effect this year requiring employers to post salary ranges in job postings.