Suburban wife Mamta Dogra claims she is ‘loving’, ‘kind’, ‘wonderful’ and ‘generous’. She smashed a little boy’s head into a basin. Now a magistrate has given her a reality check

  • Mamta Dogra hit the head of a boy (6) in the sink in the bathroom
  • Sharp magistrate dismissed her pleas for leniency

A magistrate has shot a suburban woman who smashed a boy’s head into a sink – after her lawyers tried to claim she was ‘loving’ and ‘kind’.

Mamta Dogra, from Sydney’s south, appeared before the Downing Center Local Court on Tuesday afternoon to plead for leniency.

Her lawyer cited glowing references calling her ‘wonderful’ and ‘generous’ and assured the court ‘the community can feel safe’ that they are not in danger from her.

This did not go down well with Magistrate Glenn Bartley – who read court documents in which witnesses described Dogra leaving a schoolboy ‘screaming and crying’ with ‘blood dripping down his face’ during a 2018 incident.

Dogra then told the boy to ‘shut up’ and refused to call an ambulance.

Mamta Dogra threatened the boy, 6, to keep her brutal attack a secret - which has only now come to light in court

Mamta Dogra threatened the boy, 6, to keep her brutal attack a secret – which has only now come to light in court

“Smacking (the boy’s) head into a hard sink hardly fits that (description),” said Honorable.

‘Young children cannot protect themselves from the actions of adults… where that protective trust is abused.’

Dogra has now moved to South Australia, frustrating options for sentencing her.

Her barrister Damien O’Dea, from Adelaide, objected to Mr Bartley’s findings and convictions.

Mr O’Dea said: “Your Honor, your judgment said she fabricated evidence … tried to make up events to respond to witnesses.”

“My client deserves credit,” he argued.

Magistrate Bartley replied: ‘How? I found her guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

‘I found beyond a reasonable doubt that she… scratched people and pushed (the boy) into a hard object. I didn’t really accept her as a source of great truth.’

Dogra was found guilty on four counts of assault, including causing actual bodily harm to the boy.

Mr Bartley rejected Dogra’s plea to have no convictions entered on the four assault charges, fearing she would lose her consultancy job at Medibank in Adelaide.

He described an argument by Mr O’Dea that Dogra should avoid conviction because she could then fail criminal and and working with children checks as ‘out of touch with reality’ and ‘so overwhelmingly incontrovertible’.

The magistrate was unable to give Dogra an intensive corrections order, which is effectively a prison sentence served in the community, because she lives in South Australia and it requires supervision

The magistrate was unable to give Dogra an intensive corrections order, which is effectively a prison sentence served in the community, because she lives in South Australia and it requires supervision

“I reject it,” said her Honor. ‘She hit (the six-year-old boy’s) head on a hard sink causing a cut to his head.

“Anyway, convictions are inevitable.”

The magistrate also rejected arguments by Dogra that ‘money is tight’ as she was represented by three different lawyers at one point.

‘This case has been going on for a long time… on and on and on and on and on,’ he said.

The magistrate could not give Dogra an intensive corrections order, which is effectively a prison sentence served in the community, because she lives in South Australia, and it requires supervision.

He handed her a three-year community corrections order and slapped her with fines totaling $17,500.