Texas banned US Border Patrol from border park but not golfers: Regular citizens whiz by on golf carts where federal agents are unable to arrest migrants

Two weeks into a battle between Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and the Biden administration over control of a park along the border where migrants have flooded into the U.S. illegally, Border Patrol agents are being banned, but not golfers.

On Thursday, golf carts could be seen driving across the fairway of the nine-hole golf course at Shelby Park in Eagle Pass, Texas throughout the day.

The track is just feet from where the U.S. Border Patrol has spent the past three years arresting migrants entering the U.S. and entering the park, which straddles the international border with Mexico.

Texas seized control of the park on Jan. 10, alleging that the federal government had not done enough to stem the flow of migrants, making Eagle Pass the second-busiest border crossing in the U.S.—just behind Lukeville, Arizona.

Polo-clad golfers enjoyed a sunny day at the park on the eve of a Friday deadline given to Texas by the Biden administration — demanding that the state give full access to the 2.5-mile stretch of land to the Border Patrol give.

Golfers allowed inside gated Shelby Park despite standoff between federal Border Patrol agents and Texas state troopers in Eagle Pass, Texas

Golfers allowed inside gated Shelby Park despite standoff between federal Border Patrol agents and Texas state troopers in Eagle Pass, Texas

Border Patrol agents are not allowed in the same area where golfers enjoyed sunny weather Thursday afternoon

Border Patrol agents are not allowed in the same area where golfers enjoyed sunny weather Thursday afternoon

Despite miles of fencing and razor wire at Shelby Park, regular citizens were still allowed on the property.

Despite miles of fencing and razor wire at Shelby Park, regular citizens were still allowed on the property.

Border Patrol agents, federal law enforcement officers who report to the Biden administration and are tasked with arresting migrants and securing the border, have been kicked out.

“It’s a powder keg,” U.S. Congressman Tony Gonzales, who represents Eagle Pass, told Fox News.

“I stand with the governor. You have Americans standing with Texas and saying, ‘Hey look, we’ve got to hold on, we’ve got to make sure that those who come over illegally, that there are some consequences to this.’

For years, golfers and Border Patrol agents have coexisted on the green — showing the complex reality of border cities — where migrants crawl through razor wire that rips into their flesh a few feet away from where Americans practice a rich man’s sport.

Since 2021, Texas border communities have watched as nearly 4 million migrants, according to federal statistics, have poured across the border — risking their lives and everything they own just to make it to America.

A group of Venezuelans used cardboard on their backs to avoid being cut as they crawled under a razor wire barrier placed to stop migrants from entering El Paso, Texas

A group of Venezuelans used cardboard on their backs to avoid being cut as they crawled under a razor wire barrier placed to stop migrants from entering El Paso, Texas

Migrants seeking asylum in the US gather near razor wire set up to prevent the crossing of migrants into the US as they attempt to be processed by the United States Border Patrol in El Paso, Texas, as seen from Ciudad Juarez , Mexico January 23, 2024

Migrants seeking asylum in the US gather near razor wire set up to prevent the crossing of migrants into the US as they attempt to be processed by the United States Border Patrol in El Paso, Texas, as seen from Ciudad Juarez , Mexico January 23, 2024

Clara Morales and her daughter Yuridia, migrants from Guatemala seeking asylum in the US, hug in front of razor wire set up to prevent the crossing of migrants into the US, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico

Clara Morales and her daughter Yuridia, migrants from Guatemala seeking asylum in the US, hug in front of razor wire set up to prevent the crossing of migrants into the US, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico

In Eagle Pass, and other attractions in the Lone Star State, authorities strung miles of concertina and razor wire in an effort to deal with the border crisis.

But that didn’t stop them at all.

Instead, migrants began climbing over, crawling under to drag themselves, and sometimes babies and children, through the barbed wire for the opportunity to surrender to Border Patrol agents and claim asylum.

By law, migrants claiming asylum must be given an opportunity to make their case in court – a process that can take years.

Meanwhile, asylum seekers in the US are being released while they await their court dates, even if they entered the country illegally.

The relentless waves of migrants have taken a toll on Eagle Pass, a city of only 28,000 residents.

Texas took control of Shelby Park (pictured above) on January 10th.  Since then, Border Patrol agents have been blocked from having full access to the park.

Texas took control of Shelby Park (pictured above) on January 10th. Since then, Border Patrol agents have been blocked from having full access to the park.

The Supreme Court did not rule that the wire fence Texas deployed was illegal.  The Supreme Court only said that federal agents could cut or move it if necessary

The Supreme Court did not rule that the wire fence Texas deployed was illegal. The Supreme Court only said that federal agents could cut or move it if necessary

Texas has placed razor wire at Shelby Park in the Eagle Pass, Texas attraction for over a year

Texas has placed razor wire at Shelby Park in the Eagle Pass, Texas attraction for over a year

In one week last month, 22,000 migrants crossed the river that separates the US from Mexico into Eagle Pass.

Now the city park in Eagle Pass, Texas, is at the center of a political and legal battle over whether Texas can decide on its own that the federal government isn’t doing enough to secure the border.

On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled that Border Patrol agents can cut Texas’ razor wire if they deem it necessary.

The Biden administration asked Texas to back off, but Abbott responded by claiming Texas was being invaded by migrants.

The governor also added that his state has the authority to resist federal legislation because the federal government has broken the agreement with states by not stopping migrants.

“There is no support in our history, there is no support found in other material for the idea that states can decide for themselves that they are under invasion,” said Stephen Vladeck, a professor at the University of Texas School of Law. . PBS.

“For better or worse in our constitutional system, federal laws supersede state laws, even when we don’t like how the federal government applies or doesn’t apply those federal laws. The remedies for those differences are not to allow each state to go out on their own and have their own policies.