Topic bar anyone? As Nestle axe two greatly-loved favourite treats, here are some other much-loved chocolates we wish they’d bring back

Nostalgic chocoholics were sent into mourning yesterday with the news that Nestle would be discontinuing two beloved sweets.

The Breakaway – first launched in 1970 and the Yorkie Biscuit bars – are being scrapped.

They’re just the latest in a string of chocolate bars that have been killed off over the past two decades — and some fans want them back.

The Caramac, which first appeared on shelves in 1959, was discontinued last year.

Launched in 1962 with the promise of ‘a hazelnut in every bite’, the Topic pub bid a final farewell in 2021.

And the Time Out, a waffle-based treat slathered in Cadbury milk chocolate, was scrapped in 2016 after 24 years.

Other discontinued treats included white Maltesers and the Fuse bar, which left shelves in 2014 and 2006 respectively.

Breakaway Biscuit Bar: 1970-2024

Consisting of a crunchy digestive biscuit covered in milk chocolate, the Breakaway was a school lunchbox favorite in the 1980s

Consisting of a crunchy digestive biscuit covered in milk chocolate, the Breakaway was a school lunchbox favorite in the 1980s

Consisting of a crunchy digestive biscuit covered in milk chocolate, the Breakaway was a school lunchbox favorite in the 1980s.

Its distinctive yellow casing made it stand out among significant competitors.

His fortunes were also boosted by the 1983 ad featuring the catchy ‘Don’t take away my Breakaway’ jingle.

It showed the ‘meanest geezer in the city’ being told by his mother: ‘I’ll take away your Breakaway’.

However, Nestle said it would be discontinued next month after declining sales in recent years.

Karamak: 1959-2023

Introduced by confectionery firm Mackintosh’s in 1959, the Caramac was a Generation X staple.

Its name was a combination of ‘caramel’ and the name of the firm that created it.

The name was established after a competition was held among workers at Mackintosh’s factory in Norwich.

With its distinctive red and yellow wrapper and caramel flavor, the Caramac was hugely popular until increasing competition caused sales to decline.

Nestle announced in November last year that they were scrapping it.

A spokesperson said: ‘We know fans will be disappointed to see it go, but this change will allow us to focus on our best performing brands as well as developing exciting new innovations to appeal to consumers’ taste buds. too happy.’

Introduced by confectionery firm Mackintosh's in 1959, the Caramac was a staple for Generation X

Introduced by confectionery firm Mackintosh’s in 1959, the Caramac was a staple for Generation X

Subject: 1962-2021

Introduced by Mars in 1962, the Topic has been a favorite of fans who don’t mind nuts in their chocolate.

As well as being a standalone bar, the Topic appeared in boxes of Celebrations chocolates until 2006.

In 1997, a recruitment consultant sued Mars after finding part of a dead mouse in the Topic Bar she had bought from a kiosk in London’s Piccaddilly.

She told a court how she was physically sick when she bit into the rodent’s skull, broken teeth and spine.

However, Nestle was cleared of breaching the Food Safety Act because the mouse parts were among hazelnuts sent from a supplier in Turkey to a British factory.

Mars discontinued the subject in 2021, citing declining sales.

Introduced by Mars in 1962, The Topic has been a favorite among fans who don't mind nuts in their chocolate

Introduced by Mars in 1962, The Topic has been a favorite among fans who don’t mind nuts in their chocolate

In 1997, a recruitment consultant sued Mars after finding part of a dead mouse in the Topic Bar she bought from a kiosk in London's Piccaddilly.

In 1997, a recruitment consultant sued Mars after finding part of a dead mouse in the Topic Bar she bought from a kiosk in London’s Piccaddilly.

Time out: 1992-2016

The original Time Out bars first appeared in 1992 under the slogan ‘the wafer breaks with a layer of Flake.’

The delicacy is composed of a few wafers smothered in Dairy Milk chocolate.

However, in 2016 Cadbury scrapped the bar and replaced it with the single bar ‘Time Out Wafer’.

The original Time Out bars first appeared in 1992 under the slogan 'the wafer breaks with a layer of Flake'

The original Time Out bars first appeared in 1992 under the slogan ‘the wafer breaks with a layer of Flake’

White Maltesers: 2003-2014

White Chocolate Maltesers were first introduced in 2003 as a seasonal limited edition product.

The white versions, a version of the much-loved original milk chocolate Maltesers, were an instant success.

Their popularity prompted manufacturer Mars to make them year-round.

They lasted for 12 years before being discontinued in 2014.

However, Mars has released white chocolate ‘Maltese mini bunnies’ and ‘white truffles’ in recent years and they remain on sale.

White Chocolate Maltesers were first introduced in 2003 as a seasonal limited edition product

White Chocolate Maltesers were first introduced in 2003 as a seasonal limited edition product

However, Mars has released white chocolate 'Maltese mini bunnies' and 'white truffles' in recent years and they remain on sale

However, Mars has released white chocolate ‘Maltese mini bunnies’ and ‘white truffles’ in recent years and they remain on sale

Cadbury Fuse: 1996-2006

Introduced in 1996, the Cadbury Fuse was a regular feature in lunch boxes until 2006, when it was discontinued in the UK.

The Fuse Bar included milk chocolate, nuts, raisins, cereal and fudge pieces.

Fuse has become Cadbury’s fastest selling bar since the debut of Wispa in 1983.

A significant marketing campaign led to a nationwide launch of the product on ‘FuseDay’ – Tuesday, September 24, 1996.

Introduced in 1996, the Cadbury Fuse was a regular feature in lunch boxes until 2006, when it was discontinued in the UK

Introduced in 1996, the Cadbury Fuse was a regular feature in lunch boxes until 2006, when it was discontinued in the UK

Cadbury Dream: 2001-2002

Cadbury’s Dream chocolate bar, made with real cocoa butter, gained a devoted following in the early 2000s.

However, despite its popularity, the delicacy was discontinued shortly after its launch in 2001.

It was relaunched as Cadbury White in 2019, but struggled to attract a wider following.

Cadbury Dream is still manufactured in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Cadbury's Dream chocolate bar, made with real cocoa butter, gained a devoted following in the early 2000s

Cadbury’s Dream chocolate bar, made with real cocoa butter, gained a devoted following in the early 2000s