We bought a home untouched since the 1960s… here are the bizarre things we found inside

  • ‘Dodgy’ stucco was not the strangest find by the Rowland couple
  • Their now ultra-modern first home is a far cry from the once outdated property
  • READ MORE: Nine-bed mansion equipped with a tube slide and a fire hydrant

A couple who bought a house seemingly untouched since the 1960s have revealed the bizarre features they found inside.

The couple bought the semi-detached property in July 2022 and have been documenting their renovation progress on TikTok.

Nearing the end of their renovation, they transformed their once dilapidated house into a chic and bright home, equipped with all the mod-cons.

First on the list of quirky features was a rug in their maroon bathroom.

The Rowland couple, who go by @rowlandrenos, on TikTok were stunned when they made a host of strange discoveries in their first home

The Rowland couple, who go by @rowlandrenos, on TikTok were stunned when they made a host of strange discoveries in their first home

Truly a blast from the past, the couple discovered their 60s-style maroon bathroom had carpeted floors
The pair have now transformed the space into a room more in tune with current fashions

The couple discovered a real blast from the past, their 60s-style maroon bathroom with carpeted floors, which has now been transformed into a space more in tune with current fashions

Now spacious and replete with modern tiling, a sleek bath, along with a black shower head and faucets, the room is a far cry from its once dated appearance.

Although it’s an odd sight now, carpeting was big in the bathroom in the 60s and 70s, so the room was packed with the bold fabric flooring.

But that wasn’t the only strange feature they found in their home – another peculiar aspect was what they found on their ceilings.

Traditionally you would probably expect to see wallpapers on walls – however this was not the case in the property.

Just like the 60s carpet trend, wallpapers on the ceilings and walls were a popular interior choice.

According to Wallpaper from the 70sone of the minds that inspired the trend was architect, Vernon Panton, who would often create rooms with similar colors throughout to create ‘the impression of unified environment’.

The couple’s next discovery was perhaps slightly more alarming.

Just like in carpeted bathrooms, wallpaper ceilings were also popular in the 60s.

Just like in carpeted bathrooms, wallpaper ceilings were also popular in the 60s.

The couple noticed that there was no insulation in the wooden front in their walls – which means some very cold nights if they don’t get the problem fixed.

The large gaping hole they found in their roof and the poorly plastered walls were not exactly welcome finds either.

People flooded the comments with many questions, while others were left stunned by the carpeted bathroom floor.

“No(sic) you lost me when you showed carpet in the bathroom,” one quipped.

A second wrote: ‘Carpet in bathrooms? Can you imagine the shape.’

A user shared: ‘I’m totally with you here. The bathroom rug was haunted. And the wallpaper ceiling.’

However, some of their finds were slightly more alarming than outdated fashion trends, as the young couple also discovered poorly plastered walls and a hole in their roof

However, some of their finds were slightly more alarming than outdated fashion trends, as the young couple also discovered poorly plastered walls and a hole in their roof

While many people were left stunned by the dated finds in the house, others were very passionate about the house's original maroon carpets

While many people were left stunned by the dated finds in the house, others were very passionate about the house’s original maroon carpets

Another read: ‘When my grandmother moved out of her house in the 90s, she still had round pin plugs from when the electricity was put in, in the 1930s.’

“It’s not 1960, it’s just UK,” one person joked.

However, others appeared to come to the property’s defense, saying they would still prefer that property to “a new build any day.”

One commenter expressed their love for the outdated bathroom, writing: ‘Don’t you dare destroy that bathroom, it’s beautiful.’

Another added: ‘No, those old baths are one of the best, deeper than the modern ones.’